Dean DeMagistris - Bedford, NH Real Estate, Manchester, NH Real Estate, Nashua, NH Real Estate


If you are mulling over purchasing a vacation home, then you must go over a few considerations before you make the final decision. If done for the right reasons, it can end up being a great piece of investment, as you can save hotel and lodging costs when you visit and then rent it out during off seasons.

  1. Location. Location is essential because you can't just up and move at will, so consider the area of the property you are contemplating purchasing thoroughly. Will the site accessible and attractive to future guests? Is it located in a place that is prone to natural disasters like hurricanes and storms?
  2. Calculate the associated costs. Many other costs come along with purchasing a piece of property such as utilities, maintenance, homeowner association costs, property taxes, and insurance fees. You want to factor all this and determine that they are well within your budget. If you plan on using rental income to cover some of these costs, then you have to be practical about what rental income typically is in that area.
  3. Maintenance Issues. If you are buying that vacation property as an investment, then you have to make arrangements for who is going to manage it in your absence. Things like security and surveillance are critical. The speed at which you repair a bad pipe or faulty wiring may be the final defense between your house going up in flames or flooding. If you aren't around for long periods, plan to hire a facility manager who can supervise affairs.
  4. Finances. Run a money check with your financial adviser. Get someone to look at other tax issues such as buying out of state property. You might find that property taxes on that new place may not be deductible. Are you going to be able to meet up with your other long term financial commitments?
  5. Local laws. It's always necessary to run checks on local laws and regulations about homes in the place you choose. Make sure you hire a local property professional too as they are likely to be more thorough. Are you going to be allowed to rent it out, and are there regulations on the number of days it can be rented out?

Whatever you do, make sure you cover all your bases and consult with our realtor before you sign the final contract.


Microfiber cloths have become incredibly popular in recent years. Especially within the “green clean” crowd. And with good reason, while they might look like just another cleaning cloth they are actually in a class of their own.

In fact, you could think of them as the heavyweight champions of the cleaning cloth world. Because of the “micro” in microfiber, these clothes are able to do a lot more of the grunt work without the aid of a cleaning product. And those instances you would pair it up with a cleaner? You would need far less of it than you would if using another cloth material.

I know using less cleaner or even none at all sounds counterintuitive. But here’s why eliminating the need to use cleaning product is a good thing - if you don’t properly clean the surface of cleaning product residue you are going to be creating a dirt magnet. Huh?
Yup! You see it comes down to the chemistry of how cleaning products clean. There are specific molecules inside the cleaner that when combined with water are actually attracted to dirt and grime and able to carry them away. They pick them all up and hold them close. So when they haven't properly cleared away from the surface they keep doing their job! They attract more dirt and more grime, holding on to every last bit they can.

As you can imagine the more product you have to use to clean up, the higher your chance leaving residue behind. This is where microfiber cloths save the day. Their unique two-pronged fibers that are indeed micro are able to pick up and hold onto anything it comes across. All without leaving anything behind it in its tracks.

Use dry for regular dusting and wet for all other uses. And how many there are! Tackle tile, counters, shower walls, and mirrors. All with just water and your microfiber cloth. Seriously, you won’t need glass clean or any sort of cleaning product here.

Use on a Swiffer in lieu of disposables for both dry and wet mopping floors. Keep one on hand in either your bag or car to spot clean any accidental spills on clothes. Yes, they can even tackle clothing stains! Replace germ breeding loofahs out for a microfiber. Store one in the bathroom cabinet for easy access to wipe down the counter and sink each day. And use one to wipe down the shower after use.

The care and keeping is simple. Daily clothes can be rinsed in warm water after use, machine washing weekly. However, avoid bleach and fabric softener as each will damage your cloth and reduce its effectiveness. “Refresh” clothes by boiling them in water with baking soda.  


This Multi-Family in Hillsborough, NH recently sold for $197,000. This style home was sold by Dean DeMagistris - Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Verani Realty.


28 Woodlawn Avenue, Hillsborough, NH 03244

Multi-Family

$199,000
Price
$197,000
Sale Price

3
Total Units
Perfect country Tri-plex, 3 two bedroom units, townhouse-style! Oversized Garage; small babbling brook and scenic 1 acre +/- lot. on quiet, dead-end street. Carefree town water & sewer. Modern interiors w/ 3 stoves, 3 refrigerators, 3 DWs, W/D hookups in 3 private basements, 3 decks off kitchen sliders at rear, overlooking brook view at rear of lot. Walk to downtown, church & school. Tenants pay own electric & hot water; heat paid by owner: rents could be higher! Unique find for buyer-occupant (FHA or VA ok), or for investor. Owner has management, who could continue if desired. Rare find!




Whether you’re shopping for your first house or your next house, finding a listing you love is exciting. You browse the pictures, check out the property facts, share the link to your significant other, and maybe even schedule a showing.

With the exciting prospect of owning a new home that has all or many of the features you’re looking for, it can be easy to forget about certain details that matter. Most of us look for similar things in a house--close proximity to work, enough bedrooms, an upgraded kitchen, and so on.

In this article, we’re going to give you a list of things to investigate about the house you’re looking at to get a better idea of whether or not it’s the perfect match for you and your family.

1. Re-read the listing

If you’re like me and get lost in the photos of a home and forget to make note of the details, be sure to go back and check out the listing a second time. It will likely give you important details of the house that you overlooked on your initial visit.

Look for things like the year the house was built, information of the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system, and the total acreage of the lot and square footage of the home. These things are hard to accurately represent in the listing’s pictures, but will likely be important to your decision of whether or not you should view the home.

2. Do your online research

The number of things you can learn about a home and neighborhood on the internet is astounding. We suggest that before you go to visit a home, you spend 10-20 minutes on Google researching the following topics:

  • School district ratings. If you have or plan to have school-aged children, you’ll want to know what your options are for your child’s education. It’s often a good idea to check out the local schools’ websites to see what

  • Commute times. With Google Maps and similar sites, you can plan out what your new commute will be and see how long it will take. You might find different routes that will save you time or avoid traffic (we could all use those extra few minutes in bed every morning). Google Maps isn’t always accurate when it comes to morning traffic estimates, but it’s a good place to start.

  • Amenities. Having moved into a neighborhood that has no grocery stores within a 20-minute drive, trust me--you’ll want to know what’s in the area. Use Google Maps to find stores, gas, schools, parks and trails, hospitals, and other things you’ll want close by.

  • Street view. While we’re on Google, use street view to take a remote look around the neighborhood. You’ll be able to see how the infrastructure looks--if the neighborhood is taken care of and if there are sidewalks that offer a safe place to walk or jog.

  • Crime ratings. Don’t get too caught up in this section. Crimes happen everywhere, but this is a good way to see if the area you’re moving to is a safe place

3. Don’t be afraid to ask questions

If, after all of your online research, you decide you want to go view a home, don’t be shy when you arrive. It’s understandable that you wouldn’t want to be a burden in someone else’s home. But remember--if you’re considering living there someday you’ll want to know as much as possible before making an offer.

Test the plumbing, ask about average utilities, and don’t be afraid to introduce yourself to neighbors and ask them questions about the community. The more you know, the better. Happy sleuthing!



139 Center Road, Weare, NH 03281

Single-Family

$189,000
Price

3
Bedrooms
7
Rooms
2/1
Full/Half Baths
Motivated Sellers!! Upside potential farmhouse with attached two story barn situated on nearly 2 acres of level land abutting the Piscataquog River. Wonderful covered farmers porch, fully applianced kitchen, dining area, living room with pellet stove, spacious family room, breezeway and first floor laundry. Master bedroom with beautiful new bath. Detached three car garage with plenty of storage space above. Great yard to entertain! Nearby trails. Easy to show!
Open House
No scheduled Open Houses






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